THE WEEKEND

Weekend Stress Cocktail Recipe

Have you ever heard yourself saying things like:

Other: Here take mine.

You: Are you sure? I feel bad.

Other: Want to do this?

You: No, I can’t. Sorry. I feel bad.

Other: I will help you.

You: That’s so nice, but I feel bad.

I wonder if every time we say ” I feel bad,” if we actually start feeling bad at a cellular level?

I challenge you to cut out the bad habit of saying, “I feel bad.”

Here’s what I know- you can become addicted to stress. And feeling bad seems like a free pass right to there!

I’m not a Scientist but here’s my understanding of what I have read over the past couple of years about the Science of breaking a bad habit (Check out Todd Herman’s work for more.)

Your cells are constantly receiving and replicating information. The more cortisol (stress) you produce, the more they crave it. Once they get a taste of it, they want more and more. Receive and replicate. That’s their job. And they are better at it than I’m at directing a room of 80 eight year olds. So, like they’re super, duper good.

It’s weird, I know, to think that  at a cellular level you can be addicted to stress. You see, your body feels “good” getting what it wants. Even if what it wants is bad for you. An estimated eighty something percent of disease is caused by stress (don’t quote me on that number but you get the point). Stress causes DIS- EASE.

When you start to understand your own worthiness, you start to see a different world. By replacing the bad habit of “I feel bad” and start  looking through the eyes of ” I feel good,” dopamine and serotonin and other good mojo recipes start to mix with your cells.

At first, you don’t like it. Remember your cells want the last thing they had, so if it was a stress cocktail they had (as Herman says) last time at the bar, that’s what they are ordering again! They’re not polite little drinkers either. They will make you feel more uncomfortable than being served a dirty glass.

This is why you feel like giving up after a few days of changing your habit. Even though you’ve worked out for four days (for example), now it’s day five and it isn’t fun anymore. “I want my stress cocktail,” your cells scream as you try to tie your shoes. “This dopamine on the rocks is stupid. Tastes gross. I don’t like it. Let’s quit!”

But, hold on tight. Let them cry and wail all they want because if you can keep doing the new action a bit more, past their slurring, something amazing happens.

Remember the cells job? Reproduce and replicate. So,  if you are consistent and string several days in a row of serving up the  good feelin drinks, then serve them for another several days, (past the temper tantrum) your cells start craving what your throwing down- dopamine. And all of a sudden, you’re eager to hit the gym (or whatever habit you’re trying to make happen) instead of going back to the old habit that wasn’t good for you in the first place.

The cells scream, “me likey!” And everyone is happy. Like literally.

Saying, “I feel bad,” is a habit. And we can break it by saying,  “I feel good.” You’re not going to like it at first but put a good song on the juke box, hang in their past last call, and before you know it, you’ll be ordering the good feelin drink tonight and tomorrow. And tomorrow. And tomorrow.

Not *just* on the weekend.

Cheers!